Jean Tinguely, Pandämonium, Méta-Harmonie III, 1984, 420 x 1100 x 350 cm © 2016 ProLitteris Zurich; Photo: Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Karuizawa, Japan

Music Machines / Machine Music

19 October 2016 – 22 January 2017

 

Tinguely’s sculptures always have an acoustic dimension, which was consciously composed and balanced by the artist as part of the works. They generate noises, sounds, and apparently random music. This musical side reached a climax with the four Méta-Harmonie music machines between 1978 and 1985. The exhibition will provide the unique opportunity to experience these large-scale and versatile sound boxes, which are at home in Karuizawa (Japan), Vienna, and Basel, in dialog with one another. They will form the stage for a broadly defined program of events and concerts devoted to the theme of mechanical music.


Jean Tinguely, Pandämonium, Méta-Harmonie III, 1984, 420 x 1100 x 350 cm © 2016 ProLitteris Zurich; Photo: Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Karuizawa, Japan

Music Machines / Machine Music

19 October 2016 – 22 January 2017

 

Tinguely’s sculptures always have an acoustic dimension, which was consciously composed and balanced by the artist as part of the works. They generate noises, sounds, and apparently random music. This musical side reached a climax with the four Méta-Harmonie music machines between 1978 and 1985. The exhibition will provide the unique opportunity to experience these large-scale and versatile sound boxes, which are at home in Karuizawa (Japan), Vienna, and Basel, in dialog with one another. They will form the stage for a broadly defined program of events and concerts devoted to the theme of mechanical music.

Stephen Cripps. Performance Machines

27 January – 1 May 2017

 

The oeuvre of British artist Stephen Cripps (1952-1982) was highly innovative and experimental. His works developed out of an interest for kinetic sculpture and machines as well as from a fascination for the poetic potential of explosion and destruction. Until his early death Cripps built machines and interactive installations and realised pyrotechnical performances. With his performative and multisensorial artistic practices he focussed primarily on experiments with sound. He pushed the boundaries with his radical performances, many of which even now would be unthinkable due to their potential danger to the audience and their immediate surrounds. Cripps developed many of his projects in the medium of drawing and collage, which provide an insight into his rich and unconventional mindset. This exhibition provides an opportunity for a rediscovery of Cripps’ work which is presented on a large scale for the first time at Museum Tinguely. The exhibition is a co-operation with the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds.

Stephen Cripps, Collage with Burning Photocopier, ca. 1978, © The family of Stephen Cripps/Leeds Museums and Galleries (Henry Moore Institute Archive)

Stephen Cripps, Collage with Burning Photocopier, ca. 1978, © The family of Stephen Cripps/Leeds Museums and Galleries (Henry Moore Institute Archive)

Stephen Cripps. Performance Machines

27 January – 1 May 2017

 

The oeuvre of British artist Stephen Cripps (1952-1982) was highly innovative and experimental. His works developed out of an interest for kinetic sculpture and machines as well as from a fascination for the poetic potential of explosion and destruction. Until his early death Cripps built machines and interactive installations and realised pyrotechnical performances. With his performative and multisensorial artistic practices he focussed primarily on experiments with sound. He pushed the boundaries with his radical performances, many of which even now would be unthinkable due to their potential danger to the audience and their immediate surrounds. Cripps developed many of his projects in the medium of drawing and collage, which provide an insight into his rich and unconventional mindset. This exhibition provides an opportunity for a rediscovery of Cripps’ work which is presented on a large scale for the first time at Museum Tinguely. The exhibition is a co-operation with the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds.