Collection
Museum Tinguely

Collection of Museum Tinguely

Works and work groups belonging to all phases of Jean Tinguely’s career are to be found in the museum's collection. Along with selected temporary loans, they afford the visitor an extensive view of the artist’s career. Apart from sculptures, the collection furthermore comprises a large number of drawings and letter-drawings, documents, exhibition posters, catalogues and documentation such as photographs. In the measure of the possible all the exhibits are accessible to the public and regularly shown, be it in the permanent collection or as loans to exhibitions worldwide.

The museum’s collections are the result of a generous donation by the artist’s widow, Niki de Saint Phalle, made on the occasion of its foundation, a donation of works from the Roche collection, as well as several other gifts and acquisitions.

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Jean Tinguely


Pit-Stop

1984

Material / technique: Formula 1 auto parts, scrap iron, 4 16mm film projectors
Size: 360 x 600 x 600 cm
Inv.Number: 11271
Catalog: Bischofberger 0628
Creditline: Museum Tinguely, Basel, Donation Niki de Saint Phalle

“Pit Stop” was commissioned by Renault. Parts of two race cars from the 1983 season, steered by Alain Prost and Eddie Cheever, unite in the monumental sculpture in slow, almost floating movements. The feeling of languidness is further reinforced by the repetition of a film of a pit stop in a continuous loop. The film projections, the shadows of the sculpture’s elements and the various slow rhythms of the machine parts blend to form a whole that harbours the potential to substantially irritate the viewer’s sense of time and motion. Jean Tinguely was fascinated by car races and race cars, finding their speed and highly sophisticated technology absolutely enthralling. In “Pit Stop“ rapid movements are avoided, apart from the hectic rotation of the Michelin Man. What happens here is the opposite of a Formula 1 pit stop with its frantic pace and rapid precision work. Tinguely aims not at speed, but rather at the overlapping of individual rhythms of movement.